Posts Tagged With: Triple Distilled

Tasting Notes: Tullamore DEW – XO Rum Cask Finish

 

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Tullamore Tweet Tasting

In their quest for further flavour profiles and experimentation, Tullamore D.E.W. have released their XO Rum Cask Finish triple distilled whiskey. The final product contains a blend of pot still, malt and grain Irish whiskeys, all of which have initially been matured in a combination of ex-Irish, bourbon and sherry casks, before being finished in first fill XO Demerara rum casks from Guyana to extract some of that sweet, tropical and spicy taste of further shores. The final whiskey has been bottled at 43% ABV and is available from select retailers. Without further a D.E.W…

 

 

Nose

Well, I’ve heard of salted caramel, but this initial nose seems to deliver up a salted and peppered caramel!? Is that a thing now? If this nose is anything to go by, then yes. It is sweet and firey at the same time, and has that classic Irish grassy/hay-like smell underneath. A little bit of an astringent finale.

 

Taste

Again, what I was predicting, and what I tasted are at odds, because I was expecting the rum cask finish to put in a lot of vanilla into the classic Tully flavour, but instead it’s offering up a large, rounded, and buttery body and toffee sweetness with a grassy and citrus zest (lemongrass?) backbone, and a white-peppery spice to finish.

 

Finish

After such a series of sensations, this whiskey disappears surprisingly quickly and leaves behind a strong, toasty and warming tingle throughout your throat and chest, but without much of the sweet flavour you’ve just enjoyed and developed a hankering for. The mouth is left with a little spice and a sense of intrigue and desire to get those flavours back and explore more.

 

Verdict

Having read about this whiskey and knowing that it was finished in rum casks, I thought I knew what to expect, and was looking for those tropical flavours that the blurb was promoting (I was thinking pineapples and swathes of vanilla)… the classic power of suggestion. Instead, this whiskey seemed to take the classic Tullamore DEW Original flavours that I’ve become very familiar with, and amplified all of the key components, without becoming too loud or compromising on the quality. Is that extra spice there from the rum itself or just form the extra exposure to the barrels’ oak? Whatever the science behind it, this remains a super light Irish whiskey, and has all the hallmarks of an Irish dram with a little something else to it, resulting in a very easy-drinking, if not just over too soon – its like a whiskey in a hurry.

 

Sample disclosure: This sample was provided as part of a tweet tasting, courtesy of Mr Steve Rush at @TheWhiskyWire and @TweetTastings – I’m sure he has some sort of minimum criteria, but if we can make it, then so can you! If you want to find some of those tweets from the night, then just go onto Twitter and look through the #TullamoreDEW and give him a follow and/or go over to http://www.thewhiskywire.com for more details.

 

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Tasting Notes: Tullamore DEW – 14 Years Old

 

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Tullamore Tweet Tasting

Apparently, this Tullamore D.E.W. has seldom been seen on British shores and has often been sold by the Irish whiskey-makers within the travel retail and foreign exclusive markets. Sampled here as part of a Tweet Tasting however, this 14 year old whiskey, takes the classic combination of Tullamore D.E.W. by blending their signature concoction of three grains and their pot still, malt and grain whiskies, and then maturing the whiskies in a variety of bourbon, port, madeira and oloroso sherry casks. That’s a whole load of casks! The distillery releases limited quantities of this expression however, with the distillery only producing 200 or so barrels annually, and then bottling the final product at the very precise 41.3% ABV.

 

 

Nose 

Oh, it’s tingly! The leading fragrance that I get from this is the sweet, floral nose of parma violets. Getting past that smell, the sherbet sweetness is joined by woody oak flavours and toffee. Lots of little flavours and smells coming out afterwards, including some juicy pineapple and apples.

 

Taste

The trip to the sweet shop continues, and the overwhelming flavour matches that of ‘Fruit Salad’ chewy sweets! Honest! Well, its a combination of oranges and pineapple. All that fruit on the nose remains present too but the oak is now making an appearance to bring the wood and spice to underline the whiskey’s age. The base grains haven’t entirely disappeared after the 14 years either.

 

Finish

Such a well-rounded and creamy finish! I mean, like, really creamy. It would be too obvious to say Irish cream, right, but that’s what it is like. The fruit flavours just tingle away amidst that sugary sweetness, and the soft texture and finish just slip off the tongue. Delicate, but not without flavour.

 

Verdict

This is a lovely drop. The whiskey is bursting with fruits, malts, cereals and a freshness that belies its age. It is because of this freshness that this whiskey seems, at first, quite young to the taste, but once savoured, that soft texture indicates that all that time within the various barrels has extinguished the initial fire out of the original components. On that note, the number of barrels that go into making this blend are clearly drawing out numerous influences to make this such a fresh and fruity dram. Presumably getting the right number of barrels and maturation of each component to get this flavour profile year on year must be the reason why it has a limited release. That will presumably also affect the price per bottle too, which is a real shame because I would definitely recommend this as a light, summery whiskey for anybody to try, but particularly as a soft introductory whiskey for someone looking to get into whiskey but who fears the ‘burn’ of a traditional whiskey – once I’ve finished with them, they’ll soon get used to that! That initial price point might just prevent that from happening, but presumably someone is buying is year in, year out, for it to be a regular (albeit limited) exponent and if you are lucky enough to get your hands on a bottle, then you are in for a sweet treat.

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Tasting Notes: Benromach – Triple Distilled

Benromach – Triple Distilled

Speyside’s Benromach have released some of my favourite whiskies of late. Their Organic release and their now flagship 10yo display a great balance of fruit, oak and smoke. When I had read that they were releasing a triple distilled edition, it left me wondering how the third distillation would affect the flavours and profile of their whisky, so I was thrilled to take part in the The Whisky Wire’s Tweet Tasting. The Triple Distilled release sits within Benromach’s “Contrasts” series of releases, which all see have been produced with a distinctive difference to at least one aspect of their standard whisky creation (including the different “Wood Finish” releases – which I will come onto in a later post). The Benromach Triple Distilled, and is available now for £45 RRP.

50% ABV

 

Nose

Very pure/clean. Barley upfront. Soft fruity smells – apricot & papaya. Vanilla and oak. All of these initial smells remind me of Kellogg’s Just Right. After a bit of time there’s a ginger smell and delicate smoky back. Lots going on here.


Taste

Delicious vanilla custard tart at first and then BOOM the 50% ABV (which the nose was not giving away at all) hits you. A few more sips to acclimatise and those vanilla and fruit flavours return.


Finish

It’s a boozy one to begin with and the sweetness fades first and leaves a delicate, classic Benromach smoke.


Verdict 

Given that this whisky was bottled at 50% ABV and has been triple distilled, then I was expecting it to resemble the distillery’s 100 Proof release with a more Irish whiskey finish. In general, the fellow tweet tasters thought that the extra distillation might have removed some of the distinctive character  that Benromach display, but for me, I thought that they had largely remained in tact but where their smoke finish had been taken away slightly, it had been replaced with with a smoother, softer finish. The nose, taste and finish all carried the fruity flavours across, whilst the alcohol, oak and smoke all had to take their turn. The nose really didn’t really let on that the whisky was at a relatively high alcohol percentage, but it soon made itself known one taste and finish, and as the booze burned away some of the more delicate fruity flavours it did let the smoky flavours reveal themselves towards the end. I don’t want to get too wrapped up in it, and too many things these days have a “journey”, but this was a really enjoyable dram that took me on bit of a boozy ride with lots of aspects and places of interest along the way.

 

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