Posts Tagged With: Glen Moray

Tasting Notes: Glen Moray 30 Years Old (Murray McDavid)

Glen Moray 30yo

September 2017 marked the 120th anniversary of Glen Moray distillery having been first opened and having constantly crafted the water of life. Loyal followers of the distillery on twitter have been using the hashtag #glenmoray120 to tag their celebration of the occasion. Having recently reviewed their regularly available Elgin Heritage 12 and 15 year old expressions, I was delighted that September’s Dram Team delivery contained a new and limited expression from Glen Moray. The mini miniature contained a dram of a 30 year old independent bottling by Murray McDavid under their “Mission Gold” range. There’s limited information available on the whisky itself but as a Murray McDavid release, it has been hand selected from a vintage cask and aged up to the ripe old age of 30.

49% ABV

Nose

M: Creamy. Really creamy. A real vanilla bomb. Very little boozy prickle in the nostrils. Really rounded honey and cream. Some gentle sweet fruits there too like papaya. 

Taste

M: Vanilla custard. Just like Portuguese tarts. Sweet oak in there too, which intensifies on the way down too.

Finish

M: The alcohol only shows itself on the finish as it warms on the way down. Suddenly that 49% is really prominent and leaves a peppery kick.

Verdict

M: Having tried a few of Glen Moray’s NAS cask finish series releases, I’ve enjoyed their light body and varying flavours and that was what I came to expect of Glen Moray. Delicate and woody. The recent comparison of the 12yo and 15yo however, evidenced a stark difference in flavours and body as a result of a few extra years, so the prospect of 30 years in barrel made me think that this dram would basically taste like chewing a stave. Instead it seems that 30 years have infused nothing but pure vanilla sweetness with a finish that is just sooooo smooth, and at just under 50% ABV, this dram is dangerously easy to drink. At £225 RRP for a bottle though… a small sample is all I’ll be able to enjoy at this stage…

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Happy Birthday Glen Moray!

Today sees Glen Moray distillery celebrate its 120th birthday, because on 13th September 1897 the little distillery based in Elgin made its first batch of new-make spirit. In order to join in on the celebrations, I’ve taken my two Dram Team miniatures and have done a side-by-side comparison of their cracking Elgin Heritage releases.

Glen Moray 12yo Elgin Heritage

12 Year Old Elgin Heritage

40% ABV


Nose

Light. Really light. It’s only got a gentle boozy tingle on the nose but seems quite perfumed – kinda like nail polish fumes, but in a good way?! If I had to pick one smell, then it would be barley. Pure and simple.

Taste

Light vanilla upfront. More of the same barley flavours from the nose. Light oak/barrel influence toward the end.

Finish

Over and done with pretty quickly, leaving a warming, vanilla taste. Simple and effective! 

Verdict

Very simple. Very easy drinking. Maybe too simple and too easy drinking if you’re after a whisky for savouring. The quality is not in question though and with this palate you could drink a lot of this. Pure and simple.
 

Glen Moray 15yo Elgin Heritage

15 Year Old Elgin Heritage

40% ABV


Nose

And there’s the body!! The barrel’s influence is so much more present. A slight bit of salinity to the smell and a lot more barley too. Like all the light notes of the 12yo have bulked up and come out to play. Caramel sweetness throughout.

Taste
Rich caramel flavours continue – sweetness up front but things soon take a turn and the flavours become more and more savoury and ultimately leave a black peppery spice.

Finish

Woody. Really woody. Like, chewing on some wood kinda woody. The peppery flavours have removed all that initial sweetness and it coats your thought with a spiciness that could cure the common cold.

Verdict

Well, what a difference the 3 years seem to make. I’m not sure if there are different types of barrel used but this has such a contrast to the 12yo. This I couldn’t drink too much of! Lots of flavours for savouring, with some strong elements at play. My personal preference would have been for the sweetness to stick around a bit longer, but that is hardly a criticism. Maybe my perfect Glen Moray Elgin Heritage would split the difference and be a 13.5 yo? Either way, these are two different drams that are both rather good at what they do.

Elgin Heritage Head-to-Head

Edit: Thanks to @faycoull “Mr Master Distiller’s wife” of Glen Moray for confirming that the 15yo is combination of ex-Bourbon and Sherry Cask whiskies which are married just before bottling! 👍🏻

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Tasting Notes: Glen Moray Classic Sherry Cask Finish

Glen Moray – Classic Sherry Cask Finish

Glen Moray is based in Elgin, Scotland, within the legendary Speyside region and the distillery   has seen some rapid expansion within the last 5 years or so. Their distinctive brand and bottling shows a focus on traditional distilling and with so much competition within the area, the content of their bottles really has something to prove to be able to stand out from the crowd. This particuar expression is readily available within shops and supermarkets within the U.K. at a really cheap price for a non-home-brand single malt (usually found for roughly £22) and as its name suggests, focuses on a classic sherry cask finish, so without further ado…

ABV: 40%


Nose

M: Parma violet style sweetness upfront. A deeper sniff brings out a nice earthy, oak smell (like smelling the inside of a cask, which makes sense). A bit like smelling a booze-soaked crumble.

Taste

M: It is fruity sweetness all the way with a toffee apple tang at the back and a little citrus too. 

Finish

M: Pretty damn smooth, very light and a really quick finish – it is not hanging around and leaves you wanting more.

Verdict

M: This whisky has all of the hallmarks of a good, traditional whisky done well, whisky still flying in the face of traditional whisky drinkers by not having an age statement – the emphasis being on taste and this dram is testament to the fact that good whiskies don’t have to come with an age statement (though I do really want to know how old it is on average!). It seems pretty fresh, straight forward and it is good at what it does. It doesn’t feel richly sherried, as it’s name would suggest, but it’s definitely there and makes for a very easy drinking dram. Definitely a cheap and cheerful whisky, and I’ve tasted many whiskies at a higher price which are nowhere near as good by comparison. As one of the cheapest single malts available in the U.K. Supermarkets, this therefore goes to prove that neither age nor cost actually dictate quality, and makes this a good affordable whisky for amateurs and aficionados alike. But hey, that’s like, just my opinion, man.

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